The Pelican in her Piety

The Pelican in her Piety

The Pelican in her Piety

Location

The Pelican is a traditional country pub, which is well off the beaten track. The pub is nestled below a wood on a rolling hillside, five minutes away from the beach, in a picturesque spot overlooking Ogmore Castle.

Guests can sit on chunky wooden benches in the garden and patio area, while sipping a cool beer and admiring stunning views over the estuary.

Atmosphere

Located about half an hour west of Cardiff, the seaside location and friendly atmosphere attract a lot of families, especially at weekends. The romantic setting also draws couples, who visit to enjoy an intimate dinner after a romantic stroll along the beach.

The Pelican is every inch the traditional country pub. The grey stone walls are complemented by pastel yellow window frames and window boxes full of vibrant flowers. Inside, the bar and restaurant are cosy and welcoming .

Food & drink

The pub is equally good for a beer and a bar snack or a full three-course meal. A wide range of specials are displayed on chalk boards, with several vegetarian options available. The food is hearty and the portions are extremely generous.

There is also a wide selection of real ales for the discerning beer drinker. Some might find the food a tad on the expensive-side, but the portion sizes make it worthwhile. Staff are friendly and accommodating.

Vegetarian fairs and festivals 2013

If you’re starting to think about where you might go on your holidays this year, why not plan a trip to some of these veggie fairs and festivals, which are taking place all over the UK throughout 2013.

March

March 16 – 17. Brighton VegFest is back and it’s bigger and better than ever. Expect to find more than 120 stalls spread across three floors. There will be cookery classes, live music, free nutritional advice and even speed dating.

March 23. Evesham Vegan Fair looks set to be a much smaller and more intimate affair. Organised by Midlands Vegan Campaigns, the fair will offer 20 stalls with vegan cosmetics, recipe books and Easter eggs, as well as cookery demos and talks.

April

April 13. Northern Vegan Festival will take place in Manchester on April 13. Visitors will find 90 vegan stalls, selling vegan chocolate, clothing and gifts, as well as children’s activities, films and a talk on eating out in the north of England.

Vegan cupcake stall

Vegan cupcake stall

May

May 24 – 25. VegFestUK will return to Bristol for its 10th anniversary. More than 120 stalls will celebrate every aspect of a vegan lifestyle, from food to fashion. There will also be live music, films and entertainment.

August

August 3 – 17. Vegan Camp has been running in Cornwall for 32 years. Individuals, couples and families are invited to visit for a day or stay for the full two weeks. Communal meals, camp fires and picnics make this a unique event.

October

October 5 – 6. The dates have been confirmed for a huge new show in London at the world-famous Kensington Olympia. VegFest London will offer comedy and music, alongside all the essential stalls and demonstrations.

December

December 8. You may not be thinking about Christmas just yet, but the Christmas Vegan Fayre in London’s Kensington Town Hall is a definite date for the diary. Organised by Animal Aid, the event will showcase everything you need for perfect meat-free festivities.

Photo: Binary Ape

Festival food

I remember when I used to go to festivals as a teenager and festival food was more or less synonymous with warm beer, greasy chips and overpriced burgers. But fortunately, that doesn’t seem to be the case anymore.

I went to Green Man Festival at Glanusk Park in the Black Mountains last weekend and was overwhelmed by choice. There were dozens of food and drink stalls, offering freshly cooked dishes, as well as local ciders and ales.

Thali Cafe

Thali Cafe is based in Bristol, but has been catering at events for more than 11 years. As I walked past the stall, it was impossible to resist the fragrant herbs and spices, although it was difficult to decide what to order!

I finally went for a butternut squash and red pepper curry with seasoned basmati rice, which was delicious. The portions were hearty and at £5.50, it was good value for money. What’s more, all the packaging was recyclable and biodegradable.

Green Man Festival

Green Man Festival

Pieminister

I first came across Pieminister at the Bath Food Festival and have been looking out for them ever since. They serve some delicious vegetarian pies, including a wild mushroom and asparagus variety and my personal favourite, the heidi pie.

The heidi pie is filled with goats cheese, sweet potato, spinach and red onion. You can opt to have the pie on its own (£5) or with mash, peas and vegetarian gravy (£7). The veggie gravy is tasty, but slightly tricky to eat from a takeaway box.

Shepherds

Shepherds is based at Cwm Farm in Herefordshire and specialises in ice cream made from sheep’s milk. During the summer, they run stalls at agricultural shows, music festivals and other outdoor events.

The stall offered 16 different flavours of ice cream, including chocolate, ginger and banana toffee crunch. Sheep’s milk contains more minerals and less fat than cow’s milk, so you don’t even have to feel guilty about indulging..!

Video: Sue Gibson

Mango lassi

Mango lassi

Mango lassi

I’ve tried mango lassi at several Indian restaurants, but never realised how incredibly easy it is to make. Traditionally found in India and Pakistan, but gaining in popularity worldwide, this sweet yoghurt-based drink is perfect for summer.

Preparation time: 5 mins

Serves: 2

Ingredients:

  • 100ml single cream
  • 200ml milk
  • 400ml natural yoghurt
  • 400ml mango pulp
  • 4 tsps caster sugar

Method:

Blend the ingredients together and serve with ice. It’s that easy! Here’s an alternative vegan version, which is made with coconut milk and vanilla.

Photo: Jeannie

Vegetarian restaurants in Cardiff

I’ve been living in Cardiff for nearly a year now and after reviewing plenty of vegetarian restaurants, bars and cafés, I thought it would be helpful to compile a map of the best places for veggies and vegans to eat out in the Welsh capital.

Chapter Arts Centre

Lovely light and airy café-bar, with a sunny courtyard for summer evenings. Wide range of veggie and vegan dishes available, all made with fresh and local produce. They do a particularly tasty vegetarian breakfast.

Madhav

Cosy Indian café and takeaway located five minutes away from Millennium Stadium. All dishes are vegetarian and can be adapted for vegans. They do a good selection of freshly-made Indian sweets.

Milgi

Quirky kitchen, lounge and gallery in Cathays, complete with its own yurt in the garden. All dishes are vegetarian, by popular demand. Most dishes can also be adapted for vegans. Don’t miss out on the vegetarian Sunday lunch.

Riverside Market

An integral part of Cardiff life, the Riverside Market takes place on the banks of the Taff every Sunday morning, from 10am until 2pm. There are plenty of vegetarian stalls, including Frantastic Crepes and the Parsnipship.

Vegetarian Food Studio

Vegetarian heaven! Small and cosy vegetarian café, which offers an almost overwhelming selection of Indian and Oriental dishes. Vegetarian Food Studio has won many awards, including Vegetarian Society Best Restaurant and the Guardian Food Award.

For comprehensive listings, visit the Eat Out Vegan Wales site.

Vegetarian barbecues

Vegetarian barbeque

Barbecue

After a very long slog, I finally finished my exams last week, which I thought called for a celebration! And what better way to celebrate than with a nice, sunny barbecue? Although I admit, the sunny part was slightly ambitious for Wales…

I love eating outside and was feeling the need to get my fix of Vitamin D after too many days spent shut away in my study with my head buried in a textbook! So armed with bean burgers, halloumi and plenty of cider, I set out to meet my friends.

Bean burgers

But unfortunately, it seems that barbecues are just another of those times when it’s not socially acceptable to be a vegetarian. As far as I can work out, there are three such occasions: 1. Christmas dinner, 2. Full English breakfasts, 3. Barbecues.

Your normally understanding friends are likely to do one of the following:

a) Look bemused and ask: “But what DO vegetarians eat at barbecues?”

b) Argue that beef burgers are far superior to bean burgers and swear that the smell of sausages will convert you.

c) Try to make a joke out of the whole thing by saying something like: “Well, for every cow you don’t eat, I’m going to eat two..!” (Yes, I really have heard that one.)

Vegetable kebabs

All in all, barbecues are a trying time for vegetarians. Even if you manage to persuade your friends that actually, vegetable kebabs are very tasty and that the smell of burgers probably won’t stop you being veggie after 10 years, you still have to deal with the barbecue itself.

There are a number of pitfalls here. If you’re the only veggie present and your host has provided you with a separate barbecue, you instantly feel like you’ve caused trouble and then you look like a loner with their own “special” food.

Worse still, you have to cook your food alongside all the meat and however hard your friends try to keep their burgers away, someone will inevitably say: “Sorry, I think I just got meat juice on your veggie sausages.” This is far from ideal.

But despite all this, I still love barbeques. As soon as the sun comes out, I just want to head to the beach, crack open a nice cool beer and enjoy the long summer evenings.

Photo: Spiros K

Red lentil and aubergine mousakka

Vegetarian mousakka

Vegetarian mousakka

After a delicious meal at Ezo’s Turkish Restaurant last weekend, I decided to have a go at making mousakka myself. This new take on the classic recipe uses red lentils and aubergines. In total, it takes about an hour, but it’s well worth it!

Preparation time: 30 mins

Cooking time: 30 mins

Serves: 4

Ingredients:

For the filling:

  • 1 aubergine, sliced into thin circles
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 1 red pepper, finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 tsp tomato purée
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 100g red lentils, cooked according to packet instructions
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  •  Salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the topping:

  • 125g ricotta
  • 125g Greek yoghurt
  • 3 eggs
  • freshly grated nutmeg
  • 50g freshly grated parmesan

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C.
  2. Toss the aubergine slices in olive oil, then drain and season to taste.
  3. Fry the aubergine slices until golden-brown on both sides.
  4. Add the onion, pepper and garlic to the pan and fry until softened.
  5. Stir in the tomato purée and continue to fry for a further 5 minutes.
  6. Add the chopped tomatoes and cinnamon stick and simmer for 5 minutes.
  7. Add the lentils and fried aubergines to the mixture. Simmer until warmed through.
  8. Transfer the mixture to an ovenproof dish and sprinkle with chopped parsley.
  9. For the topping, beat together the ricotta, Greek yoghurt, eggs and grated nutmeg in a bowl. Season, to taste.
  10. Pour the topping mixture into the ovenproof dish on top of the filling. Sprinkle over the grated parmesan.
  11. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the topping is golden-brown. Serve immediately.

Yummy!

Photo: Candice Eisner

Turkish delight

Falafel

Falafel

Thegreenveggie took a trip to Bristol this weekend and had the chance to sample some authentic Turkish cooking at Ezo Turkish Restaurant, which is located on the bohemian Gloucester Road in St Andrews.

After being chided for not booking a table (the waiter was half-joking, but he did give us a stern lecture!) we were seated at a table right in front of the open kitchen, where we could watch the two chefs hard at work over the grill.

Turkish cuisine is probably best known for its grilled meats, but the menu presented an impressive array of vegetarian options. In fact, with dishes like red lentil soup, feta and spinach filo parcels and grilled halloumi, deciding on a starter (or meze) proved tricky.

Falafel

Having seen the size of the main courses, my guest and I decided to share a plate of falafel (fritters made from chick peas, beans and spices). These were carefully presented on a bed of fresh salad and were accompanied by delicate swirls of homous.

The falafel were perfectly cooked – crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, with subtle hints of coriander and cumin really enhancing the flavours. This was complemented well by the mild garlic tones of the homous.

The menu provided less choice for the main course, with all of the dishes from the barbecue strictly ruled out for vegetarians. However, there were three suitable oven-baked dishes, including vegetable turlu (a kind of stew) and mixed roast vegetables.

Musakka

I decided to try the musakka, which was made from potatoes and aubergines in white sauce, topped with feta cheese. From our vantage point, I could see the chef produce a steaming ceramic dish from the oven, and the waiter immediately brought it to our table.

There was slightly too much cheese for my liking, which made the top greasy, but the roasted aubergine, which can so often be tough and chewy, was beautifully tender and infused with rich flavours of garlic, black pepper and olive oil.

We didn’t try a dessert, but the baklava (layers of filo pastry with syrup and chopped nuts) looked delicious. Definitely a reason to go back! The meal was good value for money, with most starters priced at £3.95, mains at £9.95 and desserts at £3.80.

Photo: Kudu Momo

Vegetarian blogs

When I first started thegreenveggie, I was slightly overwhelmed by just how many vegetarian blogs there are out there. Yet they’re all so different and distinct. Here are a few of my favourites…

Herbivoracious

herbivoracious

herbivoracious

Herbivoracious is a brilliant and very widely read veggie blog, with more than 92,000 subscribers. The aim of the blog is to reinvigorate vegetarian cuisine by promoting modern techniques and bold, authentic flavours.

The blog is run by Michael Natkin from Seattle. Michael worked as a software engineer for 25 years, before deciding his true passion lay in the kitchen. Since then, he interned in a kitchen, published a recipe book and now he’s planning to open a small restaurant.

Michael said: “I’ve been a vegetarian since 1984. Here’s why. I’m passionate about bringing big flavors and good culinary technique to vegetarian cooking. Not to say I don’t also love a big plate of waffle house hash browns.”

This blog is bursting with original and inspiring recipes, which are neatly archived and easy to find. It’s nicely laid out, with lovely big images, plus video and audio clips, which make the recipes really easy to follow. Definitely worth a read.

Veggie Belly

Veggie Belly

Veggie Belly

Veggie Belly is another excellent vegetarian recipe blog, with more than 5,000 fans on Facebook. The blog is run by Sala Kannan, who was born in India and grew up with fiery, bold flavours, which influenced her cooking.

Sala is one well-travelled lady and her blog combines insightful travel writing with stunning photography and unusual recipes from every corner of the globe. She describes herself as a software services entrepreneur by day and a hobby cook and food blogger by night.

Sala said: “I was raised a vegetarian and have been vegetarian for most of my life. I love it and will never change it. But you won’t see me preaching vegetarianism. I respect people’s eating choices. I have a husband who eats meat and I have no problem with it.”

Veggie Belly’s greatest strength is its beautiful photography, which makes the recipes irresistible to try and easy to follow. And with pages on home, garden and travel, this is more than just a food blog, Sala talks about vegetarianism in all aspects of life.

Vegansaurus

vegansaurus

vegansaurus

Vegansaurus is a popular vegan lifestyle blog, covering food, politics and news related to veganism. Based in San Francisco, the site was set up in late 2008 and gets over 100,000 page views every month.

The best thing about vegansaurus is its light-hearted, banterous tone, which makes it accessible and fun to read. It also has a wide range of contributors, whose distinctive voices make this site wonderfully varied and diverse.

The site is updated very regularly and has a huge amount of content, making this one of the best sites around for product reviews and recipes. This is a fun, friendly and frank blog. Definitely worth a look.