Launch of Cardiff food charter

Cardiff food charter

Cardiff food charter

A Cardiff Food Charter was launched at a Sustainable Food City conference event at Cardiff University last week.

The charter aims to promote a diverse and sustainable food culture in the city and get more people buying local Welsh produce. It also hopes to provide a framework for access to healthy, environmentally friendly food, as well as building a strong local economy.

The charter’s development has been inspired by the success of similar food charters in other parts of the UK, such as Plymouth and Bristol. It has also taken inspiration from overseas projects, such as the Cowichan Food Charter in Canada.

The charter asks people in Cardiff to play their part by cooking more meals from scratch, wasting as little as possible and buying food from independent retailers. It also encourages businesses to serve healthy and sustainable food to their employees, to buy more local food and to encourage staff to grow, cook and eat fresh food together.

During the launch event, there were presentations and workshops from a wide variety of people including local food activists, action groups, academics, food businesses and government representatives.

The next stage will be to identify funding to set up a Cardiff Food Policy Council which will encourage more businesses, institutions and individuals to sign up to the Food Charter and to oversee Cardiff’s future development as a Sustainable Food City.

Video: Cowichan Green

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Official opening of FareShare Cymru depot

FareShare Cymru

FareShare Cymru

In our article on food waste and freeganism in Cardiff, we reported that although 410,000 tonnes of food and drink are thrown away in Wales each year, there was no edible food diversion scheme operating in south Wales.

But yesterday, food redistribution charity FareShare took an important step in fighting food waste and food poverty in and around the capital, with the official opening of the FareShare Cymru Cardiff depot.

FareShare Cymru diverts edible surplus food that has been discarded by food manufacturing and retail industries and redistributes it to charities and community organisations for homeless and vulnerable people.

The new depot was opened by Environment Minister John Griffiths, who helped volunteers to pack food items for distribution to charities and homeless centres in Cardiff and Newport.

Mr Griffiths said: “Food waste and food poverty are serious problems across Wales. The Welsh Government’s Towards Zero Waste ambition is for Wales to recycle 70 per cent of its waste by 2025 and to be a zero waste nation by 2050.”

He added: “I am delighted to support the work of organisations like FareShare Cymru who work to tackle these issues, and make such valuable use of food that would otherwise go to waste.”

Last year, the food redistributed by the charity contributed towards 8.6m meals for vulnerable people. The charity runs 17 operations across the UK and 35,500 people benefit from the FareShare service every day.

Photo: (from left to right) John Griffiths AM, Welsh Assembly Minister for Environment and Sustainable Development; Michelle Chapman, Fareshare volunteer; Sarah Germain, Chair of Fareshare Cymru; Russell Lane, Low-risk Operations Manager at Tillery Valley; Keith Mason, Trustee of Fareshare Cymru; Jahan Abedi, Owner of Imperial Services; Simon Luffman, Store Manager of Sainsbury’s, Colchester Avenue.

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